The Creation of Anne Boleyn: A New Look at England's Most Notorious Queen

18 Dec

The Creation of Anne Boleyn: A New Look at England's Most Notorious Queen

The Creation of Anne Boleyn: A New Look at England's Most Notorious Queen

Susan Bordo

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: 0547834381

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


“Bordo’s sharp reading of Boleyniana and her clear affection for this proud, unusual woman make this an entertaining, provocative read.”—Boston Globe

Part biography, part cultural history, The Creation of Anne Boleyn is a reconstruction of Boleyn’s life and an illuminating look at her very active afterlife in the popular imagination. With recent novels, movies, and television shows, Anne has been having a twenty-first-century moment, but Bordo shows how many generations of polemicists, biographers, novelists, and filmmakers have imagined and reimagined her: whore, martyr, cautionary tale, proto-“mean girl,” feminist icon, and everything in between. Drawing on scholarship and razor-sharp analysis, Bordo probes the complexities of one of history’s most intriguing women, teasing out what we actually know about Anne Boleyn and what we think we know about her.

“Riveting . . . Bordo’s eloquent study not only recovers Anne Boleyn for our times but also demonstrates the ways in which legends grow out of the faintest wisps of historical fact.” —Book Page

“Engrossing . . . Ms. Bordo offers a fascinating discussion.”—New York Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.wharf.co.uk/2010/08/review-anne-boleyn-shakespeare.html (accessed March 15, 2012). Brown, Tina. The Diana Chronicles. New York: Broadway Books, 2007. Burr, Ty. “‘Boleyn Girl’ is a royal pity.” boston.com. February 29, 2008. http://articles.boston.com/2008-02-29/ae/29274755_1_boleyn-sisters-boleyn-girl-justin-chadwick (accessed March 25, 2012). Burstein, Miriam Elizabeth. “The Fictional Afterlife of Anne Boleyn: How to Do Things with the Queen, 1901–2006.” CLIO 37 (2007). ———. “The

finally safe to leave, they took their time getting home; although they reached Dover by November 14, they arrived at Eltham only by November 24. Clearly, they were enjoying their quality time alone together. By the time they returned to London, it was very likely that Anne was already pregnant, although too early for her to know it. By the date of her coronation on June 1, the pregnancy would have been impossible to hide—and probably difficult to endure through the elaborate four-day-long

after Anne’s death, became a pathetic wimp under the spell of this all-powerful temptress? I won’t begin, at this point in the book, to document all the factual errors and unjustified conclusions in this Anne-blaming, Henry-exonerating account. For now, I simply ask: Where did this view of Anne come from and how did it become so familiar, so accepted, that not only a journalist such as Bennett but also a respected historian such as David Starkey can treat it as established fact? The answer to

little bones of her neck As she looks away, And it will be done. It will be done.30 It’s romantic and moving, and beautifully written. But it is not, I believe, the poetry of Henry’s reality. In that reality, they handed him the parchment. He dipped the pen in the ink. He signed his name: Henry Rex. And it was done. PART II Recipes for “Anne Boleyn” 7 Basic Historical Ingredients CHAPUYS EXULTED OVER Anne’s fall: “I cannot well describe,” he wrote Charles, “the great joy the

Everley Gregg (as Katherine Parr), and Oberon as Anne. � United Artists/Photofest To this day, Geneviève Bujold’s fiery, proud Anne remains the quintessential portrayal for many viewers. � Universal Pictures/Photofest Dorothy Tutin brought gravity and maturity to her portrayal of Anne in the Masterpiece Theatre television series The Six Wives of Henry VIII. Photofest Natalie Dormer, who fought to make Anne more than just a seductress in the second season of The Tudors, is shown here in one

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