The 14th Golden Age of Science Fiction Megapack: 17 Stories by Charles V. de Vet (Golden Age of SF Megapack, Book 14)

11 Dec

The 14th Golden Age of Science Fiction Megapack: 17 Stories by Charles V. de Vet (Golden Age of SF Megapack, Book 14)

The 14th Golden Age of Science Fiction Megapack: 17 Stories by Charles V. de Vet (Golden Age of SF Megapack, Book 14)

Charles V. De Vet

Language: English

Pages: 167

ISBN: B00UVW0JMG

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Golden Age of Science Fiction Megapacks are designed to introduce readers to classic science fiction writers who might otherwise be forgotten.

Charles V. de Vet wrote more than 50 short stories for science fiction magazines, beginning with The Unexpected Weapon for Amazing Stories in September 1950. After a several year hiatus, de Vet became active as a writer again in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This collection spans the length of his career, showcasing his talents for vivid characterization and exciting storytelling.

About the Megapacks
Over the last few years, our “Megapack” series of ebook anthologies has proved to be one of our most popular endeavors. (Maybe it helps that we sometimes offer them as premiums to our mailing list!) One question we keep getting asked is, “Who’s the editor?”
The Megapacks (except where specifically credited) are a group effort. Everyone at Wildside works on them. This includes John Betancourt, Mary Wickizer Burgess, Sam Cooper, Carla Coupe, Steve Coupe, Bonner Menking, Colin Azariah-Kribbs, Robert Reginald. A. E. Warren, and many of Wildside’s authors… who often suggest stories to include (and not just their own!)

Contents:
• “Alien’s Bequest” originally appeared in Galaxy Magazine, June 1967
• “Catalyst” originally appeared in Amazing Stories, August 1978
• “Duel” originally appeared in Amazing Stories, November 1978
• “Return Journey” originally appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, January 1961
• “Salty for the Cat” originally appeared in Amazing Science Fiction, September 1976
• “Special Feature” originally appeared in Astounding Science Fiction, May 1958
• “Seedling” originally appeared in Astounding Science Fiction, January 1959
• “Stopover” originally appeared in The Diversifier, #24 January 1978
• “Survival Characteristic” originally appeared in Amazing Stories, July 1977
• “Big Stupe” originally appeared in Galaxy Science Fiction, March 1955
• “Delayed Action” originally appeared in Galaxy Science Fiction, September 1953
• “Monkey on His Back” originally appeared in Galaxy Science Fiction, 1960
• “Return Journey” originally appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, January 1961
• “There Is a Reaper…” originally appeared in Imagination, August 1953
• “Vital Ingredient” originally appeared in If, July 1952
• “Wheels Within” originally appeared in Galaxy Science Fiction, May 1952
• “Expendable” originally appeared in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, January 1981

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heard her, coming from the far side of the plain, as though returning from a journey, as we had planned. She was visible for nearly a mile as she came toward us. The Cat couldn’t fail to see her. Gulchin drew nearer, made to pass my hiding place— And the moment had come! A shadow eased out from the corner of the rock wall—I even thought I could detect a fringe of black hair. I trained my rifle on the spot. If the Cat moved into view it was dead. It moved into view—and I pulled the trigger.

down the wide formless street. As he neared the fourth hut, a tall young Arako warrior came out and stood in the roadway, blocking his path. On the pale hawk face was a look of disdain, a challenge in his eyes, as he rested one clawed hand on the bone knife in his belt. Joyce spread his hands at his side in a gesture meant to show that he was unarmed. “I come as a friend,” he spoke gropingly in the ancient Arako tongue. He suspected that his pronunciation was atrocious. All he knew of the

pulled himself from his blankets, his body moving with mechanical reaction. The slippers into which he put his feet were larger than he had expected them to be. He walked about the small apartment. The place was familiar, but only as it would have been if he had studied it from blueprints, not as though he lived there. The feeling was still with him when he returned to the psychoanalyst. * * * * The scene this time was more kaleidoscopic, less personal. A village was being ravaged. Men

everybody to pack up, that we’re going back home?” “I don’t know the answer,” Simmons replied. “I wish I did.” “But you do take it seriously?” “Very much so.” “The Jaate spoke for his entire race, I suppose?” “It’s always been that way.” “What’s his complaint?” “It seems that when we first came here we agreed to stay within the boundaries of the river delta. We haven’t kept that agreement.” Reget considered for a minute. “Other than a few small mines in the hills, we have. Oh yes, and the

the show ended with a short address by the runner: “I hope you have enjoyed these truly marvelous and mysterious demonstrations. Now the mystic, Lima, is available for a short time for personal interviews. The fee is very reasonable—one dollar a minute. Anyone wishing an interview please step forward.” The mystic pulled the hood from her head, smiled, bowed at the crowd, and left the stage. Bennett gasped. “The woman of the city of Thone!” * * * * “You have paid in advance for twenty-five

Download sample

Download